Henna is also known as “Hina” is a flowering plant and nature’s gift to enhance the beauty of the hair. The English name “Henna” comes from the Arabic word “hina”

The plant was found and was used in the Arabian Peninsula, South Asia, and North Africa and is widely used during important customs particularly among traditional families.

The unbroken henna leaves will not stain the skin or the hair until the leaves are crushed which releases the pigment “Lawsone” which is the orange/red dye. Drying, milling, and sifting the Henna leaves into a fine powder maximize the pigment (Lawsone) release.

The powder of henna works with air and water. Henna paste is applied directly to your hair or skin for natural and super-effective tinting. Henna temporarily tattoos the body for a longer period of time.

Henna has been used as a cosmetic hair dye for 6,000 years, in Ancient Egypt.  Henna has also traditionally been used for centuries in other parts of North Africa, the Horn of Africa, the Arabian Peninsula, the Near East and South Asia.

The plant augments best in heat up to 120F degrees & comprises more dye at these temperatures. It wilts in temperatures underneath 50F degrees. It furthermore augments better in the dry dirt than moist dirt. The leaves are in opposite decussate in twos and vary in dimensions from roughly 2-4 cm. long.

Today henna is used as a cosmetic hair dye and is available in many countries, including, United States, Canada, Australia, Japan, India, China, the Middle East and Europe. The color that results from dying with henna depends on the original color of the hair and the quality of the henna. The colors can range from orange to auburn to burgundy. Usually, henna is mixed with other natural hair dyes including Indigo to achieve brown and black shades, Cassia Obovata for lighter shades of red or even blond.